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Friday, May 2, 2008

05/02/08 - Where The Heck Is Chris Fountain And His "For What It's Worth" Column In The Greenwich Post Real Estate Section



Greenwich Is Going To Hell In A
Hand Basket

This has been a horrible week.

First I was reading the Greenwich Time Real Estate Column that is written by that guy I like to call "The Chris Fountain Wanna Be"

Because everyone knows that there is only one true real estate columnist in Greenwich and he is the almost amazing and semi-incredible Chris Fountain.

Anyway, "Mr. Greenwich Time Wanna Be" was spreading an ugly rumor in his newspaper column about how Chris Fountain's suave and debonair real estate column was a fading memory at the Greenwich Post.

I just ignored the snippy little remark, and assumed that this Mr. Wanna Be was on some kind of narcotic medication or jealous or something.

But the mother of all horrors occurred when my copy of the Greenwich Post came in the mail today.

Ahhhhh.....I COULD NOT FIND CHRIS FOUNTAIN'S FOR WHAT IT"S WORTH COLUMN.

It seems like just last week I was reading about how David Oglivy's impressive power of persuasion got all of the unwashed real estate agents inside the doors of the Helmsley estate.

I laughed at how Mr. Fountain talked of the proposed 30,000 foot monstrosity on Simmons Lane being a tad over sized. And like him I was intrigued about why an eight - bedroom house would host 26 bathrooms.

Then I remember reading that Realogy, the corporation which owns a slew of real estate firms like Coldwell Banker, Sotheby's and Century 21 was sucking wind, because of huge debt obligations and not a lack of sales.

Then I enjoyed his rant about how the mainstream media were just figuring out that palm and corn oil are not going to save the planet, but will lead to deforestation and a doubling of food prices.

I was shocked to learn that it costs as least as much energy to produce a gallon of the stuff that it yields. Who Knows, maybe Chris is right about this Global Warming thing being a "Hoax"

Lastly, I remember Chris Fountain warning everyone that newspaper reporters often attribute out of context quotes to innocent persons who are stupid enough to open their pie hole. Worse yet Mr. Fountain shocked me when he said quotes are often invented by these evil traditional mainstream newspaper reporters.

I agreed with Mr. Fountain when he clearly said, "You just can't trust those cellar dwelling mainstream reporter guys who often crawl out from under a rock to misquote innocent newspaper columnists about real estate."

I laughed so hard when Mr. Fountain singled out that New York Times reporter and called him a "dirty low down toe sucking", something or other that "did not know his rear end from A hole in the ground"

For the record I would like to note that Mr. Fountain DID NOT say that you couldn't trust one eyed citizen journalists who hunt and peck on a keyboard to deliver a Greenwich based blog.

However, I did think it was a bit much when Mr. Fountain used his "For What It's Worth" newspaper column to make several nasty comments about the reporter's "fat and ugly" mother.

After remembering how Mr. Fountain had been misquoted by the New York Times I just went and sat in my favorite chair. It's the one that no one else is allowed to sit in.

I was sitting there planning on cancelling my subscription to the Greenwich Post in order to protest the disappearance of Mr. Fountain's real estate column.

But there was a problem. I never really subscribed to the Greenwich Post. That newspaper just sort of comes labeled "current occupant".

So I just sat in my easy chair and suffered "For what it's worth" column withdrawal symptoms.

Then all of a sudden I saw my wives jar of quarters that she uses to do the laundry in the graffiti covered place commonly called

"Beautiful And Exotic Downtown Byram".

I mean her laundry jar was loaded with quarters, there was probably at least five quarters for every state in America.

As I looked at this jar full of quarters I got the biggest money making idea I ever had.

I was going to change those quarters into millions thanks to Chris Fountain.

That's right I am going to take my wives jar of laundry quarters to the Greenwich Library and photocopy the last three or four years of Chris Fountain's Columns.

Then I am going to plagiarize the heck out of each and evryone of them and everyone in Greenwich will wonder how a rude and crude citizen journalist became so insightful and witty.

All I have to do is change names and places in order to protect the innocent.

Instead of writing about a dumpy street in Riverside I will write about a dumpy street in Banksville or Cos Cob.

Soon everyone will want to invite me to their "Fancy Nancy" back country parties and I will make all kinds of high powered media connections.

Then I will most likely end up writing my plagiarized column for the New York Times, Wall Journal or maybe even the Bergen County Gazette.

But many of you are probably asking what is the rude and crude citizen journalist going to do when all the photocopied Fountain real estate columns run out.

Forget about it...

I'll just go to the Greenwich Library and checkout Mr. Fountains book about what would happen if a bunch of Indians came to Greenwich and wanted their land back.

You remember that book, don't you


Maybe, I will write a book about some Indians showing up on the Upper East Side Of Manhattan. After I write this book I go on a book tour and meet Larry King and my favorite star of all time - Uma Thurman. I always wanted to meet Larry and Uma.

Look at this I am already on my way to making my second million and I owe it all to Chris Fountain and his Greenwich Post Real Estate Column.

I sure hope Mr. Fountain means all of that stuff he wrote about being a reformed lawyer turned realator.

You know what they say, "Once A Lawyer, Always A Lawyer."

I guess I leave my wives jar of quarters alone.

Because you just can't trust lawyers.

I mean they have nothing better to do Than to go around taking

honest plagiarizers who are just trying to make a buck to court.

But I feel like I must do something about not being able to read this weeks installment of

"For What It's Worth".

I know, Monday morning I am going to get up bright and early and call the Greenwich Post and tell them that my name is "Current Occupant" and I want them to cancel ALL of my subscriptions to the Greenwich Post.

Now that's going to hurt.

I'll Bet the Greenwich Post's circulation will be cut in half.

===========================================

Update .... Update .... Update

A few Greenwich Roundup Readers

Have Informed Me


That Chris Fountain Has A Blog

Check Out This Post:

Fired! My publisher, Greenwich Post, has just fire...

Fired!

My publisher, Greenwich Post, has just fired me - according to the owner, it came down to a choice between my readers, who liked me, and certain real estate agencies who did not. The latter pays bills, the former does not, so I got the heave ho. Fair enough, but I question the wisdom of eliminating one of the few items in a newspaper that, according to my readers,anyway, made the paper worth perusing. If you have no readers, who will advertise? Oh well. I'll be punching up my posting activity on this site, so please check in regularly for truthful reporting on the real estate scene. If you'd like calm, reassuring news that your real estate investment in Greenwich is doing just fine, feel free to check the Greenwich Post each week.

News Flash

One reason I was dumped was, I believe, my reporting a New York Times report that Realogy, parent company of Coldwell Banker, Century 21 and Soetheby's, was in danger of going bankrupt. I hear from other agents that staff members of at least one of those firms haven't been paid in 4 weeks - they got flowers on their desks this past Friday. That's a nice touch, but try placating your landlord with a bunch of wilted orchads.

===================================

Now I Am Mad.

I Am Really Mad Now

Monday Morning I Am Not Going To Call The Greenwich Post

No

I Am Going To Call A Lawyer

Because

Chris "The Idea Thief" Fountain

Has Stole

My Million Dollar Idea

To Put All Of The

"For What It's Worth"

Columns

Up On The Web In A Blog !!!!!

Just Look At All Of The Stuff That This

Million Dollar

Idea Thief

Has Posted

If you want to contact my publisher It won't do an...




The Helmsley Palace Thanks to David Ogilvy’s imont class="blsp-spelling-error" id="SPELLING_ERROR_17">pre...






Arrgh! No, it’s not Pirate talk day, that’s an exp...



Bear Stearns, R.I.H. That would be rest in hell, i...


==========================================

Please send your comments, news tips and press releases to GreenwichRoundup@gmail.com

05/02/08 - First Amendment - Freedom Of The Press - You can not copyright a public document paid for with the tax dollars of single family home owners













THESE ARE SOME OF THE PICTURES THAT
BETTY "You Can Trust Me" STERNBERG
AND THE GREENWICH
BOARD OF EDUCATION
DON'T WANT YOU TO SEE

Some Public School Parents Say That These Are Some Of The "Better" Pictures

Tell Betty that you want to see the pictures of the water drainage, as well as, the crawl space pictures of the contaminated modular classrooms.

The Cover Up Continues


Betty "You Can Trust Me" Sternberg's And Her Failed Administrators Have Pulled Down The Link To The Final Report On The Contaminated Modular Classrooms

Concerned Grenville Parents Have Raised Serious Questions About This Report Prepared By Hoffman Architects.

Hoffman Architects Falsely Claims That The Report Has A Copyright.

Some Concerned Parents Are Suggesting That They May Use This So Called "Final Report" To Bring A Lawsuit Against Hoffman Architects, Betty "You Can Trust Me" Sternberg And The Greenwich Board Of Education.

No Wonder The Link To This Key Document Doesn't Work At The Board Of Education Website.

KEY DOCUMENTS

April 24, 2008
Board of Education approves motion to remediate the modular facility on the Western Middle School site. This facility will be used as the elementary relocation site for Hamilton Avenue School and/or Glenville School for the 2008-09 School Year.

April 2008 - Overview of Two Remaining Relocation Options: After due research and consideration, the Board of Education has narrowed down the elementary relocation options to two: 1.) Remediation of the modular unit at Western Middle School and 2.) using Western Greenwich Civic Center with 1-3 modular units and 1-2 other school locations. This chart summarizes the two options.

April 2008 - Pros and Cons of the Western Greenwich Civic Center Option

April 2008 - Pros and Cons of the Remediated Modulars Option

April 2008 - Building Envelope Investigation by Hoffman Associates

Go See Betty "You Can Trust Me" Sternberg's Cover-up And The Link That Doesn't Work:

http://www.greenwichschools.org/page.cfm?p=5782

Here Is The Missing Public Document That Some Idiots Are Falsely Claiming Has Copyright Protection.

Duh, Public Documents Can't Have A Copyright.

Nor Can Public Documents Be Unreasonably Withheld Form The School Parents
And Taxpayers Of Greenwich.


By The Way, The Same Idiots That Are Claiming That These Documents Have Copyright Protection Are The Same Idiots That Are saying That It Is Safe For Glenville Parents To Put Their Small Children In Contaminated Modular Classrooms.

If you want to see all of the 41 pictures
you are going to have to tell
Betty "You Can Trust Me" Sternberg
To Make The Link To This Public Document A Working Link At The Public School Website.

Here Is What
Betty "You Can Trust Me" Sternberg
And The
Greenwich Board Of Education
Are Trying To Hide From You:

==============================

Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms
Greenwich, CT
Architect’s Project No. 208019
25 April 2008
Town of Greenwich
101 Field Point Avenue
Greenwich, CT 06836
Hoffmann Architects, Inc.
2321 Whitney Avenue
Hamden, CT 06518
203/239-6660
Photo 1: Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008



Contents
Executive Summary 1
Introduction 2
Observations 3
Evaluations 4
Recommendations 5
Drawings 6
General Information 7
Appendix A 8
Appendix B 9
Appendix C 10
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Executive Summary
In February of this year, a roof leak was reported in Room 7of the Hamilton Avenue School
General
Modular Classrooms. Observations of the water damage in this room caused by the leak
revealed considerable mold issues in the soffit and moisture in the exterior wall assembly.
This prompted a series of investigations throughout the building.
Hoffmann Architects’ activities included destructive investigations into the walls, soffits and
ceilings as well as visual observations of the exterior walls, crawl space under the building
and the roofing system.
The majority of the moisture infiltration issues that are occurring in this building are
Soffits
confined to the soffits. The severity of the moisture infiltration varies greatly throughout the
building. The most severe infiltration was noted in the soffits at the northwest portion of the
building.
The moisture can be attributed to the poor insulation/vapor retarder issues in the soffits
resulting in condensation along the uninsulated face of the soffits, infiltration through the
roof membrane and, to a lesser degree, absorption through the T1-11siding. Without any
ventilation in the soffits, the moisture cannot escape, thereby creating conditions where
mold can grow.
The walls of the units are constructed of wood studs with kraft backed fiberglass batt
Walls
insulation. A weather barrier is secured to the outside face of the studs. Texture1-11
plywood acts as both the sheathing and the exterior building siding. Probes into the wall
spaces revealed that the vast majority of the walls are dry with no evidence of moisture
infiltration beyond the weather barrier.
The roof of the buildings is in good overall condition. However splicing and termination
Roof
details of the roofing membrane provide many places where water can enter below the
membrane and travel down the slope of the roof deck into the soffit.
The ground on which the buildings were constructed is damp, thereby creating an extremely
Crawl Space
humid space which will allow mold to grow. Considerable condensation was observed on
the foil faced insulation under the building floor. Additionally, the skirt that surrounds the
building, to visually conceal this space, is inadequately vented. This plywood skirt is also
embedded into the ground, which allows moisture to wick upward.
Overall, the condition of the building is good. The units were constructed and assembled on
site in accordance with the stamped drawings. With the exception of the soffit detail, we
believe that the units were designed and constructed in general conformance with accepted
standards and practice for use as a temporary facility housing classrooms and office space.
It is our opinion that the structure can be renovated to remove the issues that promoted the
mold growth and to prevent future similar mold issues.
In order to eliminate the issues related to moisture infiltration that are being experienced at
the Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms and create a dry and safe classroom
environment, a comprehensive rehabilitation program should be initiated. This program is
outlined in the Recommendations section of this report. Our opinion of probable cost of
construction for this work is $375,000. We estimate that the renovations/repairs should take
3-4 months to complete. We estimate that under an accelerated schedule, the recommended
program of repairs can be completed in 2-1/2 months. This would increase the cost of
construction by approximately 25 percent. Additional costs associated with the
rehabilitation of the modular units, including site work, remediation and mitigation of
existing mold and other environmental issues are outlined in Appendix B.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 3



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Introduction
On 5 March 2008, Mr. Arthur L. Sanders, AIA, Director, Architecture of Hoffmann
Architect Retained
Architects, received a telephone call from Mr. Alan Monelli, Facilities for the Town of
Greenwich on behalf of the Greenwich Board of Education to discuss issues related to
moisture infiltration at the Hamilton Avenue School modular buildings in Greenwich,
Connecticut. Mr. Monelli requested that Hoffmann Architects perform a building envelope
investigation to determine the cause or causes of the infiltration.
On 5 March 2008, Hoffmann Architects submitted a proposal to the Town of Greenwich to
perform the work.
The modular classrooms at the Hamilton Avenue Schools consist of 30 pre-fabricated units,
Building Description
each 68 feet long with widths varying from 8 to 14 feet. Each unit is constructed of
dimensional lumber framing with laminated veneer lumber structural beams and
prefabricated trusses comprising the roof structure. The exterior walls are constructed of
Texture 1-11 plywood over wood studs with batt insulation. The units were transported by
truck from Pennsylvania and assembled on site to create one large building.
Mr. Monelli stated that water leaks were recently discovered in one of the classrooms.
Owner’s Concerns
Investigation into the cause of the water leaks revealed some mold growth in the exterior
soffits of the building. This discovery prompted a more thorough investigation into the
building with regard to weather tightness and air quality issues. Results of the investigation
revealed that the mold growth appears to occur throughout the exterior of the building.
Moderate to heavy mold growth was discovered in several areas of the soffit. Additionally
some areas of wet insulation were found in the exterior wall assembly.
The Town of Greenwich is concerned with the mold growth and would like to determine the
root cause. Additionally, they wish to determine if the modular classrooms can be repaired
and renovated to provide a dry, clean and safe learning environment. To that end, the Town
of Greenwich requested that Hoffmann Architects locate sources of water infiltration, review
the construction of the units, and provide recommendations regarding appropriate
rehabilitative efforts to correct deficient conditions.
On Wednesday 12 March 2008, Mr. Steven Susca, P.E. Senior Engineer visited the site to
History of Investigation
observe general site conditions. During this site visit, Mr. Susca met with Mr. Al Monelli,
Director of Facilities, Town of Greenwich, Ms Leslie Moriarty, Board of Education, and Mr.
Anthony Byrne, Director of Facilities, Greenwich Public Schools to tour the modular
classrooms and observe the current condition of the structure.
Mr. Susca returned to the site on Tuesday, 8 April to select locations for invasive probes to
be made in the exterior wall assemblies. A total of 15 locations were chosen to Many of the
invasive probes spanned the joint between two adjacent units. Mr. Susca returned to the site
on Wednesday, 9 April to perform the investigation. Also present during the investigation
were Mr. Michael Scharff, Director, Navigant Consulting, and Mr. Robert Brown, of
Hygenix, Inc
The investigation consisted of a visual assessment of the building envelope with particular
emphasis on the soffits and cavity between the interior ceiling and the underside of the roof
deck. The conditions of the roofing system and the crawl space under the building were also
evaluated. Exterior observations were made from the ground and roof and other readily
accessible areas.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 4



208019 Building Envelope Investigation

Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Probes into interior spaces were made to observe concealed conditions. These probes
consisted of removal of the gypsum board walls and ceiling at areas of concern and in other
locations to determine typical construction details and evaluate the condition of the wall
cavity and insulation. It should be noted that all interior invasive probes were performed in a
controlled environment with the requisite safeguards in place to avoid contamination of the
building.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 5



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Observations
The modular classrooms constructed in 2005 consist of 30 individual units connected in the
General
shape of a T and comprise a total of 35 classrooms, offices, and other interior spaces. The
footprint of the building is approximately 26,500 square feet.
Each individual unit is supported by a structural steel frame which is in turn supported by
cast in place concrete footings. The original drawings indicate that the footings vary in size
and are installed to a minimum depth of 42 inches below finished grade
The exterior sheathing of the modular buildings is comprised of Texture 1-11 plywood. This
Walls
sheathing also acts as the exterior siding. Interior to the T1-11 is a weather barrier, and kraft
backed fiberglass insulation. Vinyl covered gypsum board provides the interior finish for the
walls. Each unit comprises a portion of two classrooms with a corridor between them.
Photo 2: Typical exterior wall.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 6



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Numerous probes were made into the exterior walls throughout the building to observe
concealed conditions. The interior walls are comprised of vinyl faced gypsum board and
wood studs which extend from the floor level to the ceiling. The walls are insulated with
kraft paper backed fiberglass batt insulation. The kraft paper on the insulation, situated on
the interior side of the wall cavity, acts as a vapor retarder. A perforated polyolefin
membrane weather barrier is secured to the exterior face of the studs just inside of the T-1-11
siding.
All invasive probes performed within the building were performed inside enclosures erected
to avoid contamination of the interior spaces.
Photo 3: Typical enclosure in which invasive probes were performed.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 7



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Photo 4: Typical conditions inside walls showing kraft paper backed insulation. Note insulation is clean and
dry.
Observations of the wall cavities revealed that the interior spaces of the walls are clean and
dry. In some instances however, black staining was observed on the kraft paper. This was
initially believed to be mold, however closer observation revealed it to be an asphaltic
adhesive used to secure the paper to the batt insulation that simply soaked through the paper.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 8



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Photo 5: Close up of bottom of wall cavity showing inside face of weather barrier. Note wall base plate is
clean and dry. This condition is typical throughout the building.
Photo 6: Black staining on kraft paper in Room 18.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 9



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Photo 7: Close up of black staining showing that it is actually adhesive that soaked through the paper.
In Room 7, where the roof leak that prompted this investigation is located, a small amount of
mold was observed on the interior face of the T1-11 sheathing. We were told that moisture
was also observed in the wall assembly and insulation in this location when the roof leak was
initially reported.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 10



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Photo 8: Small amount of mold on interior face of T1-11 siding in Room 7. Note: weather barrier was cut
away in this location to reveal the sheathing.
The weather barrier on each individual unit is secured to the exterior face of the studs. As
each unit was constructed, this weather barrier was wrapped around the last stud and secured
to the side. When two successive units are joined together, this weather barrier is
discontinuous across the joint. Furthermore, gaps that vary in size from approximately 1⁄2
inch to 2 inches exist between units. Fiberglass batt insulation is installed in the space
between units. On the exterior of the building a batten board is used to close the gap. It was
found that the weather barrier was not extended across the opening, however it should be
noted that in no location was moisture found in the gap between units.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 11



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Photo 9: Gap between adjoining units. Note discontinuous weather barrier.
Photo 10: Typical junction between adjacent units. Batten board conceals the gap.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 12



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
A plywood skirt is installed around the perimeter of the building to conceal the underside of
the building and to prevent entry by animals or children. This skirt extends from the floor
level to the ground and is embedded several inches into the soil. Louvers are installed into
the skirt at regular intervals to provide ventilation to the underside of the building. Moisture
was observed to be wicking from the ground upward in the plywood skirt.
Photo 11: Building skirt embedded into soil. Also note louvers in skirt.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 13



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
A horizontal batten board is installed at the junction between the exterior wall sheathing and
the T1-11 skirt. Sealant applied to the joint between the horizontal batten board and the
sheathing protects from water intrusion. In many locations, this sealant joint was observed to
be damaged, or missing.
Photo 12: Horizontal batten board at building skirt. Note discontinuous sealant joint
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 14



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Soffits extend outward from the face of the building at the tops of the exterior walls. The
Soffits
soffits have a rectangular cross section measuring approximately 1 foot wide by 2 feet high.
The vertical face of the soffit is comprised of T1-11 while the underside of the soffits is
standard exterior grade plywood. At the north, south and west ends of the building the soffits
are omitted. By design, there are no soffit vents.
Horizontal batten boards are secured to the top and bottom of the vertical face of the soffit as
well as to the joint between units. In addition to closing gaps in the sheathing, the boards
also serve as architectural feature. Joint sealant is installed at many of the joints between the
T1-11 and the batten boards to protect against water intrusion. In many locations, this joint
was found to be damaged or missing.
Photo 13: Typical soffit at top of exterior walls
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 15



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Photo 14: Underside of soffits.
Photo 15: View of exterior face of soffit from roof. Note discontinuous sealant joint at lower soffit batten
board and gap between batten board and sheathing.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 16



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
PVC drain leaders transect the soffits at every other unit. The leaders are not insulated where
they pass through the soffits.
Photo 16: Roof drain leader passing through soffit.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 17



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Photo 17: Roof drain leader passing through soffit.
Observations of the interior of the soffits were made through openings in the ceiling in 15
separate areas located throughout the building. Many of the openings spanned between two
adjacent units. The interior construction details of the soffits are different from unit to unit.
In many units, a thermal and vapor retarder (kraft paper backed insulation) extends up
beyond the top of the exterior wall to the underside of the roof deck. This barrier is secured
to the top plate of the wall as well as the underside of the roof, thermally isolating the soffit
from the remainder of the building. However, contrary to the walls, it was observed that the
kraft paper was situated on the exterior face of the insulation.
In numerous other units, batt insulation was installed between the top of the wall and the
underside of the roof deck. However in this instance, the insulation was observed with no
vapor retarder and was not adequately secured to either the wall or the roof deck. It was
simply laid in the space loosely.
Still in other locations, no insulation was installed to thermally isolate the soffit from the rest
of the building. The space was simply left open to the interior of the building.
It should also be noted that in some of the soffits, daylight was visible at the exterior
sheathing when viewed from the inside. This typically occurred at the junction between
adjacent units. Additionally no weather barrier was found in any of the soffits.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 18



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Photo 18: Interior of soffit in Room 10 showing kraft backed insulation installed between top of wall and roof
deck. Note vapor retarder is on the cold side of the insulation.
Photo 19: Exterior view of same soffit in Room 10.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 19



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Photo 20: Loose laid batt insulation in soffit of Room 2.
Photo 21: Uninsulated soffit.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 20



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Initial observations made in Room 7 revealed heavy mold growth along the interior vertical
face of the soffit. An even black coating of mold covers the interior of the sheathing. The
soffit in Room 7 is uninsulated and the pattern of mold growth was consistent with that
which would be found resulting from condensation, however further investigation throughout
the building revealed moisture and mold in varying degrees in the soffits throughout the
building. As in Room 7, the moisture and mold primarily was found on the vertical and
lower horizontal surfaces of the soffits. However some mold growth was also found on
structural elements of the soffits to a lesser degree. In most locations, the mold observed was
spotty.
In isolated areas of the building however, heavy or severe mold growth, similar to that which
was found in Room 7 was observed in the soffits. This type of mold growth was observed in
both insulated and uninsulated soffits. Furthermore, in rooms 8, 10 and 15, significant
moisture was also found inside the soffits. The soffits in these rooms were thermally isolated
with kraft backed insulation however were still found to be wet inside. This indicates that
condensation is not the only issue creating these conditions.
Photo 22: Severe mold growth on vertical face of uninsulated soffit in Room 7.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 21



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Photo 23: Spotty mold at vertical surface of uninsulated soffit in multipurpose room.
Photo 24: Some minor mold growth on sheathing and structural elements in soffit of room 3.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 22



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Photo 25: Moisture and mold growth in Room 8 insulated soffit.
Photo 26: Room 10 soffit. Note mold growth on vertical and horizontal surfaces as well as structural
elements.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 23



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Photo 27: Room 15 soffit. Note mold growth on structural elements, and water staining on horizontal
surface.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 24



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
The roof of the building is comprised of a 45 mil thick single ply EPDM membrane. The
Roof
membrane is fully adhered to rigid insulation boards which are fastened to an oriented strand
board roof deck. The roofing membrane is carried over the edge of the roof and terminated
on the face of the soffit with fasteners and a termination bar that also serves as a rain diverter.
Numerous rooftop HVAC units are installed on the roof. The units are set on equipment
curbs which are flashed into the roofing system.
Photo 28: Typical roofing termination detail
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 25



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
At locations where the individual building units are joined, variations in the construction
along with installation imperfections resulted in misalignment at the soffit and roof. In some
locations this has caused detailing issues with the roofing terminations resulting in gaps in
the roofing membrane.
Photo 29: Gap in roofing termination at intersection between adjacent units.
The roof of the building is pitched from the center towards the drains which are located at the
soffits. Tapered insulation is installed at the edge of the roof to allow water to freely travel
toward the drains. Evidence of ponding water and debris build-up was observed throughout
the roof. Additionally, previous repairs were also found in many locations.
Many failures were observed in the roofing system. The failures typically occur at locations
where flashing membranes are installed. The failures generally consist of debonding of the
flashing membrane from the substrate creating an opening where water can easily enter into
the building.
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208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Photo 30: Area of ponding water.
Photo 31: Debris build-up at edge of roof.
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Photo 32: Previous roofing repairs.
Photo 33: Opening in flashing membrane installation.
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208019 Building Envelope Investigation
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At the intersection between adjacent building units, a 12 inch wide strip of rubber flashing
membrane is adhered to the EPDM membrane to span the gap between units. Lap sealant is
applied along the edge of the flashing membrane for the full length. At many locations this
sealant was found to have pulled away from the edge of the flashing strip.
Photo 34: Typical roof closure strips between individual units.
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208019 Building Envelope Investigation
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Photo 35: Roofing lap sealant pulling away from flashing strip.
At one location, a flashing boot that is installed at the gas line penetration in the roof is
recessed and can hold water. The underside of roof deck in the soffit under this location was
found to be wet with mold growing on the surface.
Photo 36: Recessed flashing boot at gas line penetration.
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208019 Building Envelope Investigation
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Photo 37: Gas line penetration in roof deck. Note rusted gas line and mold on surface of deck indicating
water infiltration through recessed flashing boot.
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208019 Building Envelope Investigation
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Fire separation walls extend above the roofline in three locations. The roofing membrane is
carried up and over the firewalls and is terminated at the ends of the walls with a bead of
roofing sealant. In some locations this sealant joint has failed
Photo 38: Poorly configured roofing termination at fire separation
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208019 Building Envelope Investigation
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Observations into the crawl space under the modular buildings were made through an
Crawl Space
opening in the floor of Room 7. The floor structure of the modular units is comprised of 2
layers plywood underlain by batt insulation and a 1 inch rigid polyisocyanurate insulation
board with foil facing on both sides. The rigid insulation board is discontinuous between
structural steel framing members.
The space under the units was found to be extremely damp. The surface of the rigid
insulation was wet and a strong odor of mold emanated from the crawl space. However,
probes revealed the insulation beyond the foil facing to be dry. No moisture or mold was
observed on the underside of the floor.
It was found that the building is constructed over loose soil without surface preparation or a
vapor barrier. Furthermore, the topography of the site promotes moisture in the soil beneath
the building. Athletic fields sit atop a hill immediately to the east of the modular classrooms
which slopes downward toward the site upon which the classrooms are situated. This allows
runoff from the sports facility to drain directly to the location of the buildings, thereby
saturating the ground. It should be noted however that no standing water was observed.
Additional observations of the crawl space made through access hatches cut into the skirt,
revealed surface rust on the structural steel members supporting the units.
Photo 39: Opening in the floor of room showing 2 layers plywood, batt insulation and foil faced rigid
insulation.
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208019 Building Envelope Investigation
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Photo 40: Hill on the east side of building allowing runoff to drain directly to the building site.
Photo 41: Crawl space under room 6. Note discontinuous rigid insulation boards and surface rust on steel
members
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208019 Building Envelope Investigation
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Evaluations
The majority of the mold issues that are occurring in this building are confined to the soffits
General
of the individual modules. The severity of the mold infestation in the soffits varies greatly
from very little to severe. The most severe issues with regard to mold and moisture
infiltration into the soffits occur in the northwest portion of the building. Here, significant
moisture as well as mold growth was observed in the exterior soffits of each unit.
Through convection, warm air will always try to move toward cold. Additionally, warm air
Walls
has the capacity to hold much more moisture than cold air. Therefore when it comes into
contact with a cold surface, condensation forms. The purpose of a vapor retarder is to
inhibit movement of warm moist air from the inside of the building into the wall cavity
where it has no means of escape. If this warm moist air were to come into contact with the
cold exterior sheathing, condensation would form. With no means of escape, this
condensation would lead to the formation of mold on the surface of the sheathing.
The construction of each individual unit consists of an insulated exterior wall with kraft
paper on the interior side of the insulation. The kraft paper acts as a vapor retarder. Initial
reports indicated that the vapor retarder was installed on the wrong side of the insulation.
These reports were incorrect. The configuration of the exterior walls is consistent with
accepted practice in the Northeast. The kraft backed insulation is secured to the sides of the
studs inside the wall cavity with the vapor retarder facing the interior of the building.
Although this is the generally accepted practice, a more effective vapor retarder would be
created if the wings of the kraft paper were attached to the face of the studs.
The weather barrier installed on the exterior side of the insulation is meant to prevent any
water that passes by the exterior sheathing from entering into the wall cavity. This can be
through openings in the sheathing, wind driven rain or absorption through the plywood
sheathing. When moisture in liquid form comes into contact with the weather barrier, it
simply runs down the barrier and escapes at the bottom of the wall. Furthermore, the barrier
is perforated to allow any vapor that is trapped in the wall cavity to escape. These
perforations however are sufficiently small to prevent liquid water from passing through
unless under hydrostatic pressure.
The gap between individual units where the weather barrier is discontinuous is a weak point
in the system. Moisture from wind driven rain can easily migrate beyond the batten board
and into the insulation in the gap. Although no mold or moisture has yet been found in these
locations, they should be addressed.
The exterior walls terminate at the ceiling level. At this location, roof trusses form an attic
Soffits
space above the gypsum board ceiling. This attic space extends beyond the face of the
exterior wall creating a soffit. These soffits are primarily architectural features of the
building and do not comprise a vital part of the building envelope. The roof is insulated with
rigid polyisocyanurate boards between the roof deck and the roofing membrane. This
effectively makes the attic space part of the rest of the building with respect to thermal
conditions.
As noted previously, there are three differing conditions with regard to the construction of
the soffits. In many instances, the soffit is thermally separated from the rest of the building
by the installation of kraft backed batt insulation between the wall top plates and the
underside of the roof deck, however in just as many instances, no insulation was found to
thermally isolate the soffit or insulation was simply loose laid in the soffit.
In soffits where no insulation was found or where it was simply loose laid in the space, a
condition that promotes condensation on the interior surface of the sheathing is created. The
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208019 Building Envelope Investigation
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lack of insulation at the exterior face of the soffit creates a breach in the fully insulated box
described above. As warm moist air in the building migrates towards the outside wall, it
comes into contact with the cold surface of the soffit sheathing and condensation forms.
Since there is no means for venting the soffits, the moisture cannot escape, thereby creating
dark and damp conditions in which mold can thrive. Review of the construction drawings
revealed that no thermal barrier isolating the soffits from the remainder of the building was
detailed. Furthermore there is no indication on the plans that soffit vents are to be installed.
In the locations where the kraft backed insulation is installed to isolate the soffit, the vapor
retarder is on the wrong side of the insulation. Since the attic is insulated on top of the roof
deck instead of at the ceiling level, a fully insulated box is created making the attic part of the
interior of the building. Therefore, by reversing the location of the vapor retarder at the
locations of the soffit moisture can travel into the insulation. However, since the insulation
in the attic space is not confined in a wall cavity, there is sufficient air movement to allow
moisture in the insulation to dry out.
Moisture and mold growth was noted in the soffits where this kraft backed insulation was
installed. In some locations considerable moisture and water staining was found. Since there
is a vapor retarder separating the inside of the building from the outside (even though it was
installed improperly) this indicates that there are other forces at work which create damp
conditions in the soffit. Review of the exterior of the building envelope in relation to the
soffits revealed several issues that contribute to the moisture in the soffits.
The joint between adjacent units is simply covered by a batten board. In some instances the
vertical joint is sealed with silicone building sealant, in other locations the joint sealant is
either damaged or missing altogether. As noted previously, daylight was observed through
the exterior sheathing of the soffit in some locations which indicates a location for moisture
to enter.
Roofing issues were also found that can contribute to the moisture in the soffits. The roof of
Roof
the building is pitched from the centerline of the building toward the outside where the roof
drains are installed. For this reason, most of the active roof leaks that have been discovered
are at the location of the soffits. Any rain water that falls on the roof is diverted to the edges
where the soffits are.
Splicing and termination details of the roofing membrane provide many places where water
can enter below the membrane and travel down the slope of the roof deck into the soffit.
Additionally, the flashing strips applied to the roof that span the gaps between units do not
sufficiently allow for movement between modules. Due to the modular nature of this
building, there is significant differential movement between individual units. This movement
can be caused by a number of conditions such as high winds, thermal expansion and
contraction, or building occupants moving between units in large numbers.
Differential movement between units imparts excessive stresses on the roof flashing
membrane strips and the lap sealant applied to the edges. This in turn will result in localized
failures such as seams opening up or membrane pulling away from the lap sealant. In order
to minimize the chances of leaks occurring at the joints between units, a wider flashing strip
should be installed over the existing. This strip should be installed with provisions to allow
for differential movement between modules.
The crawl space below the building is extremely damp. This is caused by the lack of a vapor
Crawl Space
barrier on the ground and the site conditions on which the buildings were constructed. The
hill to the east of the buildings directs runoff directly to the site on which the buildings sit,
creating damp conditions in the soil. A plywood skirt around the base of the buildings
effectively closes of the underside of the buildings from children and animals, however the
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208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
louvers that were installed in the skirt are not large enough to provide adequate ventilation to
dry out the space. Consequently, considerable condensation is forming on the underside of
the foil faced rigid insulation board. Although the foil facing on the insulation board is
meant to prevent moisture migration into the insulation, the amount of condensation on the
facing is far beyond that which would be considered acceptable. The discontinuous
insulation boards also allow this moisture to reach the batt insulation and floor of the units
where mold can grow.
As noted previously, the vast majority of the moisture infiltration issues are confined to the
exterior spaces of the building, primarily in the soffits. This moisture can be attributed to the
poor insulation/vapor retarder issues in the soffits resulting in condensation along the
uninsulated face of the soffits, infiltration through the roof membrane and gaps in the siding,
and to a lesser degree, absorption through the T1-11siding. Without any ventilation in the
soffits, this moisture cannot escape. Thereby creating conditions where mold can grow.
Overall, the condition of the building is good. The units were constructed and assembled on
site in accordance with the stamped drawings. With the exception of the soffit detail. We
believe that the building units were designed and constructed in general conformance with
accepted standards and practice for use as a temporary facility housing classrooms and office
space. We also believe that the structure can be renovated to remove the issues that
promoted the moisture infiltration and to prevent future issues related to moisture, thereby
providing a clean, dry and safe environment.
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208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Recommendations
In order to eliminate the moisture infiltration issues in the Hamilton Avenue Modular
Classrooms, and prevent future issues related to moisture, a comprehensive rehabilitation
program with a probable cost of construction of $375,000 should be initiated. This
rehabilitation program should include the following major items

Walls and Soffits Removal of soffits around the entire building. This work will include demolition of the
soffits and reconfiguration of the roofing terminations at the building perimeter. This
will also require the installation of a rain gutter at the perimeter where the soffits have
been removed and subsequent tie in of the existing drain leaders. As part of this work,
the drain lines should be tested to ensure that they all function properly. This will
eliminate the vast majority of the moisture infiltration issues that have plagued this
building. Additionally, it will allow storm water to drain from the roof in the event of
ice dams or other clogs in the drain lines.
• Installation of vinyl siding throughout. This will also help to prevent moisture
absorption through the T1-11 siding. This siding should be installed onto furring strips
that are attached to the existing T1-11 sheathing. The furring strips will allow air
movement behind the siding to help keep the cavity between the siding and sheathing
dry. A weather barrier should also be installed at the same time. If it is deemed
necessary through moisture content testing, the T1-11 sheathing should be dried out
prior to installation of the siding. Another option would be to remove and replace the
sheathing.
• Installation of attic space ventilation. Implementation of the above recommendations
would result in a concealed attic space above the gypsum board ceiling. This space
would need to be ventilated.

Crawl Space Install a vapor barrier such as polyethylene sheeting under the buildings and cover with a
layer of gravel or processed stone. This will help to ensure that no moisture migrates up
from the ground under the building and create a mold issue. Currently, the foil faced
insulation that was installed under the building is preventing moisture migration into the
modular structures, however, a more proactive measure to control moisture in the space
below the building will help to prevent future problems with regard to moisture
infiltration and mold growth
• Remove the skirt that surrounds the modular buildings and replace with a PVC lattice
and bird screen. This will allow air circulation below the buildings thereby drying out
any moisture that may become trapped.

Roof Roof repairs should include reconfiguration of the roofing termination at the perimeter
of the buildings, at the junction between adjacent units and at firewall extensions.
Currently, a 12 inch wide strip of rubber flashing membrane is installed at the junction
between adjacent units. Hoffmann Architects recommends that a second 24 inch wide
strip be installed over the existing with a foam rod at the centerline to allow for
expansion and contraction between units.
Our opinion of probable cost of construction to complete this work is approximately
$375,000. We estimate that the renovations/repairs should take 3-4 months to complete.
This estimate does not include the costs for replacing the exterior sheathing. We estimate
that this work would result in an additional $50,000 in direct costs and add approximately 1
week to the construction schedule.
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208019 Building Envelope Investigation
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In addition to our recommendations, Mr. Rob Brunetti suggested some site remediation to
improve the drainage conditions with regard to the surrounding areas. These
recommendations are included in Appendix A in the form of an e-mail sent to Ms Sue
Wallerstein. Mr. Brunetti estimates the cost for these recommendations to be an additional
$25,000.00.
Under an accelerated schedule, it may be possible to complete the work in 2-2 1⁄2 months.
This would add an estimated 25% to the overall cost of construction.
It should be noted that all time and costs associated with remediation and mitigation of
existing mold or any environmental issues that may arise are not included in the above
opinion of probable costs of construction. Mr. Robert Brown MS, CIH, Director of
Industrial Hygiene for Hygenix, Inc., estimates these costs to be approximately $90,000. His
estimate is included in Appendix A.
We envision the following sequence of work:
• Installation of necessary environmental controls to ensure building interior is protected
from contamination;
• Removal of soffits and reconstruction of the top portion of the exterior wall;
• Reconfiguration of the roofing termination at the new edge of the roof;
• Removal of the skirt that surrounds the crawl space under the building and installation of
PVC lattice (this work can be performed concurrently with the soffit removal);
• Installation of a dampproofing membrane under the building (this work can be
performed any time after removal of the building skirt).
• Drying out or removing and replacing exterior sheathing if necessary and installation of
a weather barrier
• Installation of new vinyl siding;
• Installation of a hung gutter and tie into existing drain leaders;
• Installation of new roof flashing membrane strips at the interface between adjacent units.
The above sequence of work is our opinion on how the work may best be completed in a
timely and efficient manner. Sequencing and scheduling of construction activities is
generally determined by the contractor as part of their means and methods to complete the
work specified and therefore may differ from the above.
With proper maintenance and the implementation of the above recommendations, it is our
opinion that this building can have an expected life span of up to 15 years. However it
should be noted that there are components within the entire building system that may require
more frequent repair or replacement.
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208019 Building Envelope Investigation
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Drawings
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 40



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
General Information
Statements of opinion of probable construction costs given in this report do not include
Construction Costs
professional fees for consultants concerning repair procedures, preparation of construction
documents, assistance with bidding, construction contract administration, or on-site
observation of construction. Construction costs projected in this report represent our
opinion as to what the probable costs, in today's dollars, might be to implement the
recommendations. They are based on our experience supplemented by published cost
estimating sources. They reflect preliminary data and have not been derived from accurate
quantities, drawings, details, or specifications. Actual construction costs may therefore vary
from the costs in this report. All time and costs associated with remediation and mitigation
of existing mold or any environmental issues that may arise are likewise not included in this
statement.
Duplication Restrictions This report is for the sole use of the party for whom the report was prepared. Use of its
contents by third parties shall only be with written permission of Hoffmann Architects.
Unauthorized use is prohibited and shall release Hoffmann Architects from any and all
liability associated with such use. Reproduction of this document, except by the party for
whom it was prepared for its own internal use, shall be by written permission of Hoffmann
Architects only.
Construction Use Notice This report is not intended for any purpose other than to report on conditions observed. Its
language and recommendations are not sufficiently detailed or specific enough, nor have
any drawings been provided, that could serve as a basis for securing proposals for or
executing the recommended work. This survey does not represent that unseen problems
may not exist. No representation is made or intended that implementation of our
recommendations will place the property in a condition wholly free of all defects or hazards.
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 43



208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Appendix A
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 44



Steven J. Susca
Sue Wallerstein [Sue_Wallerstein@greenwich.k12.ct.us]
From:
Wednesday, April 16, 2008 12:56 PM
Sent:
Steven J. Susca
To:
Nvoye@aol.com; Lesliemori@aol.com; rbrunetti@pecorabrothers.com
Cc:
Greenwich - Modular Remediation
Subject:
Steve,
Nancy Weissler asked that you please include $25K in your modular remediation report (DRAFT
slated to be emailed to Nancy tomorrow, Thurs.) for the scope of work described in the
attached report from Rob Brunetti.
Basically you should include $25K for site work.
Please call or email if you have any qusetions.
Thanks,
Susan Wallerstein
Greenwich Public Schools
290 Greenwich Ave.
Greenwich, CT 06830
203-625-7471
sue_wallerstein@greenwich.k12.ct.us
----- Original Message -----
Sue,
Aubrey and I met at the modulars today and reviewed the site plans and the drainage
characteristics. We did not see any areas of major concern and don't think that any specific
design work is needed. We did however see a few areas that could be improved with some
simple grading adjustments that could be implemented. All adjustments can be made by a
landscaper or by a site contractor during the remediation of the units when the skirts are
being taken off anyway. Aubrey can be on site at that time and can describe some
grading/drainage improvements and if necessary help direct some of the adjustments. Here are
some items:
1) Field Side - there are two catch basins and a partial swale at field side of the trailers.
The one closest to the Jr. High building is set low and seems to be effectively draining 1/2
the area. There is even a little rise before the trailers that should prevent water from
getting under the units. The drain farthest from the Jr. High building seems to be high and
the sidewalk area as well as part of the hill drainage may not be getting to the drain. We
think the drain can be lowered by 8"-12" and a deeper swale can be cut into the grade between
the sidewalk and the hill, better intercepting the water from the hill.
2) Access ramps/decks - At every ramp/platform area there seems to be a localized depression.
Some extra fill creating a positive slope draining water from under the decks and ramps away
from the underside of the units can solve these locations.
3) Area between the interior corner of the trailers where they make a 90 degree turn by the
play area - This area near the benches seems to be flat and possibly drains toward the
underside. Once again, a little local berming at the trailers to induce more positive
pitch...plus maybe a small yard drain tied into the leader drain line shold help. We would
1
be surprised if the current condition was causing extra water under the trailers as is
anyway.
4) Apartment Side - The property edge between the school's property and the apartments is
pretty much separated by a drainage ditch cutting off run-off from entering the property. As
you get closer to the parking lot, the drainage ditch goes away and the adjacent property
most likely drains onto the parking lot...but we don't see any of this water getting to the
trailers as it gets directed to the parking drainage structure.
Aubrey does not recommend having an engineering design done to address these items as he
believes the solutions are low-tech and the money is better spent on additional grading,
adjustment to one catch basin and possibly a few yard drains. The total cost should be small
and pretty much any landscape contractor can do this. I recommended that you included $25K
in your estimates for a place holder for some labor and fill material and a few drains. This
should be more than enough and would easily cover costs of the work and some time to have he
or one of his engineers on site a few times with the actual contractor. I don't think $25K
added to your remediation budget will "tip the scales" for any decision between the two
options on the table.
Rob
-----Original Message-----
From: Sue Wallerstein [mailto:Sue_Wallerstein@greenwich.k12.ct.us]
Sent: Tuesday, April 15, 2008 11:10 AM
To: Aubrey E. Mead Jr.
Cc: Robert Brunetti; Nvoye@aol.com; Anthony Byrne
Subject: Re: Friday Direction
Aubrey,
Thanks for the follow up. I spoke with Tony Byrne, the school system's Director of
Facilities, and it's our understanding that while your primary scope of work relates to site
plans @ the Western Greenwich Civic Center, the BOE wanted you to take a quick look at the
modular facility adjacent to Western Middle School. Based on preliminary reports from other
consultants working on the feasibility of remediating the modular facility, it's been
suggested that the site would benefit from a curtin/french drain on the northwest side of the
modulars, at the bottom of the slope coming down from the athletic field to reduce the amt.
of runoff going under the modular buildings. I believe at this pt. what we need is minimal A
& E, a general opinion about feasibility, and a rough estimate of cost. I have a set of
utility drawings for the site if someone can pick them up @ my office.
Regards,
Susan Wallerstein
Greenwich Public Schools
290 Greenwich Ave.
Greenwich, CT 06830
203-625-7471
sue_wallerstein@greenwich.k12.ct.us
"Aubrey E. Mead Jr." writes:
2
>>Sue,
>>I understand there is a drainage issue related to the area of the
>>temporary classrooms at Western Middle School. We are told this issue
is
>>outside and is not associated with the water and mold problems caused
by
>>the building construction. I reviewed the stream of emails this
morning.
>> I originally was under the impression I was going to meet with Rob at
>>the site and follow up with a proposal for our services. After
reviewing
>>the emails, it seems to me that what the Team has in mind would be for
me
>>to visit the site and offer conceptual information on possible
solutions
>>to help the Team with their report having a Thursday, April 17
deadline.
>>We can follow up with more detailed studies or designs after the 17th
if
>>requested. It would be helpful if Rob had as much information as
>>possible at today's meeting. Items such as surveys, maps of existing
>>storm drains and utilities, would be helpful. I will copy the Town
>>GIS for the area in preparation of the meeting unless Rob already has it.
>>In consideration of the speed in which this is coming up, I suggest we
>>use this email as our proposal. We will provide our services related
to
>>the drainage problem at Western Middle School on a time and expense
basis
>>in accordance with the attached Schedule of Fees. Kindly verify that
you
>>wish us to proceed as outlined above by simply responding to this
email.
>>Sincerely,
>>Aubrey Mead, Jr. P.E.
>
>
>
3
Environmental Consultants (203) 324-2222
And Laboratory Services Fax (203) 324-9857
HYGENIX, INC.
49 Woodside Street Stamford, CT 06902
Leslie B. Moriarty, Vice Chairman April 24, 2008
Greenwich Board of Education
Havemeyer Building
290 Greenwich Avenue
Greenwich, CT 06830-6521
Re: Hamilton Modular School at Western Middle School
Cost Estimates for Mold Remediation, Drying and Environmental Consulting Services
Dear Ms. Moriarty:
Attached are cost estimates for mold remediation, drying and related environmental consulting
services at the Hamilton Modular School. The estimates were prepared by Hygenix Inc., with
technical assistance from All Pro Cleaning & Restoration Services of Elmsford, NY. The
following services are included in the cost estimates:
Item 1 - Remediation
Work related to removal of fascia and underside of soffits
Work related to remediation of wall between Room 6 and Boys Bathroom
Provide containers and disposal for waste generated during remediation
Item 2 – Drying
Construction of plastic sheeting enclosure around exterior of building
Drying of T-111 panels to a moisture content less than or equal to 14% in at least 95% of the test
locations on the interior surface of the panels
Provide disposal for plastic sheeting and waste generated during drying
Item 3 – Professional Services
Preparation of Technical Specifications for remediation and drying
Full-time monitoring during remediation with electronic dust monitors
Background sampling and post remediation verification inspections and tests
(Note: Cost estimate does not include periodic monitoring during the course of the school year)
I will e-mail copies of the estimate to Hoffman Architects and Turner Construction. Should you
have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at 203-324-2222.
Sincerely,
Robert C. Brown, MS, CIH
Director of Industrial Hygiene
HYGENIX, Inc.
HAMILTON1.LTR/rb
Attachment
CC Stephen Susca, Hoffman Architects
Philip Mazzatti, Turner Construction
HYGENIX, Inc. 49 Woodside Street Stamford, CT 06902 203-324-2222
COST ESTIMATE
TO: Leslie B. Moriarty, Vice Chairman
Greenwich Board of Education
Havemeyer Building
290 Greenwich Avenue
Greenwich, CT 06830-6521
DATE: April 12, 2008
RE: Hamilton Modular School at Western Middle School
Mold Remediation, Drying and Environmental Consulting Services
The following cost estimates were prepared by comparing the proposed work with similar projects
performed or overseen by Hygenix Inc. Technical input regarding the cost of mold remediation
and drying were provided by All Pro Cleaning & Restoration Services of Elmsford, NY.
The following summarizes the scope, cost, and estimated time to complete the work:
Item 1 - Remediation
Work related to removal of fascia and underside of soffits
Work related to remediation of wall between Room 6 and Boys Bathroom
Provide two 20-yard dumpsters for disposal for waste generated during remediation
Estimated Time to Complete Item 1: 10-14 days
Estimated Cost for Item 1: $ 40,000.00
Item 2 – Drying
Construction of plastic sheeting enclosure around exterior of building
Drying of T-111 panels to a moisture content less than or equal to 14% in at least 95% of the test
locations on the interior surface of the panels
Provide disposal for plastic sheeting and waste generated during drying
Estimated time to Complete Item 2: 7-10 days
Estimated Cost for Item 2: $ 20,000.00
Item 3 – Professional Services
Preparation of Technical Specifications for remediation and drying
Full-time technician monitoring during remediation with two electronic particle counters
Background testing, post remediation verification inspections/testing after remediation, and
inspections/testing immediately before students return
(Note: Cost estimate does not include periodic monitoring during the course of the school year)
5 days for technical specs, background sampling
Estimated time to Complete Item 3:
14 days monitoring
4 days post remediation verification
Estimated Cost for Item 3: $ 30,000.00
Further detail on the scope of each item can be provided on request. Cost estimates are
intended for planning and budgeting purposes and should not be considered as a bid for
performance of the work.
2
208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Appendix B
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 45



Summary of Cost Estimates
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms
Rehabilitation of Existing Modular Units
Hoffmann Architects Base Recommendations $375,000.00
Add Replacement of exterior sheathing $ 50,000.00
Add Site work as recommended by Rob Brunetti $ 25,000.00
Subtotal $450,000.00
Additional 25% for accelerated Schedule $112,500.00
Subtotal $562,500.00
Mold Mitigation, testing and environmental work as per Bob Brown $ 90,000.00
A/E Fees, Hoffmann
Architects:
Contract
Documents 20,000 (est)
MEP Consultant 5,000 (est)
Bidding Services 5,000(est)
Construction Administration 24,000 (est) $ 54,000.00
Total $706,500.00
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 – Proprietary and Confidential Information
208019 Building Envelope Investigation
Hamilton Avenue School Modular Classrooms Greenwich, CT
Appendix C
Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 Page - 46



Hoffmann Architects Profile
Founded in 1977, Hoffmann Architects specializes in the rehabilitation of the building envelope.
The firm’s work focuses exclusively on the exteriors of existing structures, diagnosing and
resolving deterioration within facades, roofing systems, windows, waterproofing materials,
plazas/terraces, parking garages, and historic and landmark structures. Our technical professionals
investigate and correct damage resulting from time and weather, substandard or improper
construction, design defects, material failures, poor workmanship, structural movement, and
stress.
As a professional consulting firm, Hoffmann Architects is committed to designing solutions that
are innovative and cost-effective, technically appropriate and aesthetically appealing. What sets
the firm apart is our design team’s sensitivity to the demands of occupied buildings, and our
expertise at applying state-of-the-art solutions to technically demanding projects. For this
leadership and competence, Hoffmann Architects has garnered national recognition from building
owners and managers as well as from our peers in the architectural, engineering, and construction
communities. Hoffmann Architects combines meticulous investigation and document preparation
with the latest developments in materials, methodology, and design to achieve lasting results.
Our Services
• •
Failure/Distress Investigations Construction Administration
• •
Litigation Support Construction Management
• •
Remedial Recommendations/Designs Project Representation
• •
Contract Document Preparation Expert Witness Services
• •
Materials Specification Structural Engineering Services
• •
Bidding Assistance Local Law 11 Investigations
Our Focus
Hoffmann Architects provides Condition Assessments, Programs of Rehabilitation/
Restoration/Replacement, and Maintenance/Master Plans for existing:
• •
Facades Roofs
• •
Parking Structures Windows
• •
Plaza/Terraces Historic/Landmark Structures
Distress in one building system can adversely affect the function of others. That’s why Hoffmann
Architects works to ensure that root causes of deterioration are uncovered and addressed, from the
initial investigative phase through design and construction administration. Once the underlying
problem has been identified, ensuring that solutions are implemented as designed is critical to
achieving long-term success. Hoffmann Architects formulates rehabilitation recommendations
while considering not only the nature and extent of deterioration, but also technical parameters,
building style and characteristics, aesthetics, and occupancy concerns during construction, as well
as budget and scheduling objectives. A project is only successful if all involved – owners,
managers, tenants, professionals – feel satisfied, both with the process and with the end result.
Hoffmann Architects’ three offices are strategically located in Hamden, Connecticut; New York,
Firm Size/Capacity
New York; and Washington, D.C. The firm routinely accommodates fluctuations in workload,
often coping with demanding project scheduling requirements. Hoffmann Architects is confident
in its ability to successfully meet future demands while concurrently responding to existing
workloads.



Copyright Hoffmann Architects, Inc. 2008 – Proprietary and Confidential Information



Hoffmann Architects, Inc.
Representative Water Infiltration Projects
Town of Fairfield, 16 Public Schools
Facade & Roof Assessments and Rehabilitation, Water
Infiltration Consultations and Remediation, Building
Envelope Investigations and Repair
Fairfield, CT
Hoffmann Architects’ professional relationship with
the Town of Fairfield, Connecticut Board of Education
began in January 2002 when the firm was selected to
perform a complete envelope investigation of McKin-
ley Elementary School, a 100 year old elementary school that exhibited signs of significant
damage. Subsequently, the Town has selected Hoffmann Architects to provide investigative
services, building envelope surveys in conjunction with indoor air quality studies, façade repairs,
roof replacements, and window replacements at Fairfield’s sixteen public schools.
Current and recent projects at Fairfield Public Schools include:
• Stratfield Elementary School, Façade Repairs and Partial Roof Replacement
• Jennings Elementary School, Building Envelope Investigation , Roof and Window Replacement
• Tomilson Middle School, Masonry Façade Investigation and Rehabilitation, Roof
Condition Assessment and Replacement
• Warde & Ludlowe High Schools, Building Envelope Investigation/Evaluation
and Façade and Window Replacements
• Mill Hill, North Stratfield & Osborne Hill Elementary School, Building Envelope Repairs
• North Stratfield Elementary School, Buiilding Envelope Investigation
• Osborn Hill Elemntary School, Building Envelope Investigation
• Mill Hill Elementary School, Building Envelope Investigation
• Roger Sherman Elementary School, Building Envelope Investigation
• Timothy Dwight Elementary School, Building Envelope Investigation
• Holland Hills Elementary School, Building Envelope Investigation
University of Connecticut
Law School Library
Water Infiltration Investigation and Façade Stabilization
West Hartford, CT
The University of Connecticut Law School Library is a
10-year-old monumental building. Since the building was
first occupied, leaks were observed at various locations
within the building. Investigations by others were initiated
by the University in 2000. Results of those investigations
indicated that water was entering the building façade at intersections of through-wall flashings and
precast units throughout the building. Hoffmann Architects was retained by the University to perform
a more extensive investigation which confirmed defects at flashings, and also indicated air-flow condi-
tions conducive to water transmission through the wall assembly. Although not in the original scope
of work, a potentially hazardous condition was found at masonry anchors employed to stabilize the
stone veneer. The anchor system was found to be structurally deficient, thereby potentially allow-
ing the exterior veneer to become destabilized and fall if subjected to a significant wind or seismic
event.To repair defects and suspend further deterioration of the facility, Hoffmann Architects recom-
mended a comprehensive repair program. Hoffmann Architects has prepared Contract Documents
for the program of repairs and provided Bidding and Construction Administration phase services.
Hoffmann Architects Specialists in the Rehabilitation of Building Exteriors
Hoffmann Architects, Inc.
Representative Water Infiltration Projects
25 Sigourney Street
Building Envelope Survey and Rehabilitation
Hartford, CT
This government office building is a 470,000 sf, 19-story
facility built in 1987.The structure is enclosed with a brick
veneer, and glass curtain walls accentuate the prominent
corners and the front entrance. The building skin is a ma-
sonry cavity wall comprised of a standard size glazed, cored
brick, and concrete block back up. Hoffmann Architects
conducted a comprehensive survey and prepared a report
documenting the extent of masonry and roof coping dam-
age due to water penetration. Based on the survey results,
the firm provided design and construction administration
services to rehabilitate the facade, including: removing and replacing of displaced, cracked, and dam-
aged bricks for the entire facade; replacing the sealant at masonry control joints and expansion joints;
removing soldier course of brick at all relieving angles and installing new flashings; removing brick
courses at steel lintels and installing new flashings; and installing metal caps at brick window sills.
1131 Sasco Road, Residence
Water Infiltration Consultation
Fairfield, CT
Hoffmann Architects provided waterproofing consulta-
tion services for a new residence at 1131 Sasco Road, a
shore-front lot in Fairfield, Connecticut. The residence is
a two-story wood structure with several dozen rooms
on the two main levels and seven below-grade spaces.
Exterior materials include wood clapboard, zinc metal
roofing tiles, and a cast concrete foundation with a decorative stone water table exposed at grade.
Waterproofing issues included foundation and sill protection, light well and terrace interfaces, upper
terrace (balconies) waterproofing, and roofing and eave ice, snow, and water issues. Hoffmann Archi-
tects services included the review of C/S Architecture’s preliminary plans and details, waterproofing
system research and selection, and review of plans and details.
Columbia University – Dodge and Lewisohn Halls
Waterproofing and Plaza Rehabilitation
New York, NY
Hoffmann Architects was selected by Columbia University’s
Department of Design and Construction to conduct a
condition assessment survey and to prepare contract
documents for the remediation of water infiltration into
the lower areas of two academic facilities located at
Morningside campus in New York, New York. Water infil-
tration remediation measures included the rehabilitation
of twenty-seven areaways around the perimeters of the
buildings and the installation of a new waterproofing system on a 7,500 square foot plaza and a
twenty-two foot high sub-surface foundation wall. Site improvements associated with the water-
proofing of the plaza included new landscaped areas, irrigation and storm drainage systems, lighting,
site furnishings, and plaza paving.
Hoffmann Architects Specialists in the Rehabilitation of Building Exteriors
Hoffmann Architects, Inc.
Representative Water Infiltration Projects
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Upper Campus Laboratory
Construction Monitoring Services - Waterproofing
Cold Spring Harbor, NY
Centerbrook Architects and Planners contacted Hoffmann
Architects, Inc., to retain technical services during installa-
tion and construction of the specified waterproofing sys-
tems at the vertical and horizontal surfaces of a new com-
plex under construction on the Upper Campus of Cold
Spring Harbor Laboratory. New cast in place concrete
foundation walls were being formed and poured on site at the facility. In several locations, exposed
foundation walls were ready to receive waterproofing and back filling of the soil.
Inspection services were related specifically to the surface preparation and spray applications of the
Procor and Decothane coating.
Folger Shakespeare Library
Waterproofing Repairs
Washington, DC
Constructed on two levels of cast-in-place concrete in 1976,
the Folger Shakespeare Library’s book vault houses the Li-
brary’s collection of rare books and materials. Hoffmann Ar-
chitects was initially engaged to provide consulting services
related to water infiltration conditions at the interior walls, and
at the juncture of the walls and ceiling inside the book vault.
The firm then prepared Contract Documents with a recom-
mended program of repairs and improvements to the waterproofing membranes and drainage system.
In addition to the firm’s work at the Library’s Book Vault, Hoffmann Architects recently completed
a water infiltration investigation at the Main Library and the Reading Room. The Reading Room
was constructed in 1982 immediately adjacent to the three-story, stone-clad Main Library Build-
ing. Water infiltration conditions had caused damage to interior finishes at the exterior walls
and windows of the light well at the Main Library Building, and at the roofs, skylights, and south
alcoves of the Library’s Reading Room. To address these problems, Hoffmann Architects recom-
mended a program of repairs including replacement of damaged bricks, installation of through-wall
flashing with weeps at window heads and sills and at levels of the roof deck and third floor slab,
cutting out and repointing of all mortar joints, and removal and replacement of all sealant joints.
Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History
Water Infiltration Investigation
Washington, DC
During periods of heavy rain, water was entering the Mu-
seum of Natural History’s archive storage area through
the wall or, at the juncture of the interior wall and ceiling.
Hoffmann Architects was retained to investigate the cause
of the water intrusion, and to develop a program for repairs
to resolve the problem.
Hoffmann Architects Specialists in the Rehabilitation of Building Exteriors
Hoffmann Architects, Inc.
Representative Water Infiltration Projects
1166 Avenue of the Americas
Plaza Rehabilitation and Waterproofing
New York, NY
A failing waterproofing system at this 25,000 sf plaza
resulted in water infiltration into occupied space below,
prompting a full rehabilitative effort. Following its survey/
investigation and probe-testing program, Hoffmann Archi-
tects prepared design documents and specifications for the
complete removal and replacement of the existing plaza
overburden and waterproofing system, down to the structural deck.The firm led a team of landscape
architectural and design professionals who collectively reconfigured the plaza space, redesigned the
plaza’s lighting, and enhanced the plaza’s amenities through the design and construction of new retail
space. Hoffmann Architects worked closely with the project team to successfully accommodate the
technical and aesthetic requirements represented by this project.
University of Connecticut
Weston A. Bousfield Hall
Plaza and Planter Waterproofing
Storrs, CT
Surrounding the Bousfield Hall Psychology Building at the
UCONN campus are five elevated, brick-paved plazas,
some with planters, that have been damaged by water infil-
tration.The University retained Hoffmann Architects to in-
vestigate the deteriorated condition of the plazas, develop
a program of repairs, and assist the University during the
implementation programs. Hoffmann Architects reported
that the waterproofing systems at the plazas and planter, and the wearing surfaces of the plazas were
beyond their lifespan and required replacement in order to stop water infiltration into occupied
areas below the plazas and to eliminate tripping hazards. Existing stairs, ramp and handrails leading to
the plazas were not in compliance with current building codes and federal regulations and required
reconstruction or replacement. The design team determined that water infiltration and masonry de-
terioration at Bousfield Hall was the result of poor detailing, failure to adequately plan for water flow
and removal, material selection, and incorrect installation of waterproofing membrane at the plazas.
Hoffmann Architects prepared contract documents that addressed repairs to the plazas, planters,
cavity walls, and parapet walls and addressed the ADA compliance issues. The repair program was
implemented with Hoffmann Architects’ staff providing construction administration services.
Yale New Haven Hospital
Water Infiltration Investigation and Terrace Rehabilitation
New Haven, CT
Hoffmann Architects investigated the causes of extensive
water leaks at the 5th, 6th, and 7th floor terraces of this
medical facility, and developed repair recommendations.
The rehabilitative work included replacing the existing roofing systems with a two-layer rubberized
asphalt sheet membrane system, relocation of the existing stone ballast, and resealing of joints in
the existing coping stones and the new concrete curbs and railing posts.., and the owner, Goodwin
Square LLC.
Hoffmann Architects Specialists in the Rehabilitation of Building Exteriors
Hoffmann Architects, Inc.
Representative Water Infiltration Projects
Pfizer, Inc. World Headquarters
Façade and Roof Rehabilitation
New York, NY
The firm designed a comprehensive exterior rehabilita-
tion program that included design and contract docu-
ments through construction administration services for
full roof replacement and facade rehabilitation at 235 East
42nd Street, a 33-story structure featuring a glass-and-
metal curtain wall, and at 219 East 42nd Street, a 10-story
brick structure. The roof replacement included complete
removal of the existing roofing systems and installation of
a two-ply rubberized asphalt roofing system with asso-
ciated flashings, drainage composite, insulation, masonry
ballast, and sheet metal work. Brick parapets were re-
moved and reconstructed in some areas, and a tapered
concrete fill was used to create positive drainage on the
penthouse roof.
Facade rehabilitation activities included replacing win-
dow sealant, expansion joints, and cracked brick; sealing
cracked limestone; repointing the brick facade; repairing
window components; replacing deteriorated steel guard
rails; and repairing and replacing dislodged copings and
other measures to correct water infiltration at the copings.
Nine West Group Inc. Corporate Headquarters
1111 & 1113 Westchester Avenue
Façade, Roof, and Plaza Rehabilitation
White Plains, NY
Nine West opted to undertake extensive exterior rehabilitation of its leased facilities prior to occu-
pancy. Hoffmann Architects provided rehabilitative design and construction administration services
to fully re-caulk the facades, and to replace roofing, skylights, and soffits at the two 4- story buildings
which comprise the company’s headquarters. Additional work included full reconstruction of the
pedestrian plaza and adjoining lobby floor.
Chase Manhattan Centre
1201 Market Street
Water Infiltration Investigation and Façade Rehabilitation
Wilmington, DE
Hoffmann Architects was initially commissioned to investigate the causes of water infiltration at the
Market and 12th Street entrance facades of this one-block -square office complex. The water infiltration,
determined to be caused by failed sealant joints, inadequate flashings, and insufficient drainage, had led to
staining of the granite veneer, heaving of door thresholds sufficient to prevent proper door operation, and
corrosion of the aluminum door framing. As a result of its investigation, Hoffmann Architects was asked
to provide comprehensive rehabilitative design services to correct the water infiltration problems. The
scope of rehabilitative work included removal and replacement of the sealant of all stone and aluminum
joints, installation of a flashing cap at the Market Street entrance, modifications to the entrance walks and
building thresholds, and repairs to deteriorated metal work at all entrances. As part of the work, the firm
also designed the upgrading of the Market Street door frames for ADA compliance.
Hoffmann Architects Specialists in the Rehabilitation of Building Exteriors
Hoffmann Architects, Inc.
Additional Representative Water Infiltration Projects
State of Connecticut, Department of Public Works, Connecticut State Library and Museum, Water
Infiltration Study, Hartford, CT
Poplar Point Partners, Ltd., 88 Hamilton Avenue, Water Infiltration Investigation, Stamford, CT
The George Washington University, The George Washington University, Marvin Center, Water Infiltration
Investigation, Washington, DC
Columbia University, CV Starr East Asian Library, Air and Water Infiltration Consultation, New York, NY
Grubb & Ellis Management Services, Inc., The Crowne Plaza Times Square, Water Infiltration, Roof and
Facade Investigations, New York, NY
Howard Whittemore Memorial Library, Water Infiltration Investigation, Naugatuck, CT
The Paramount Group, Inc., The Paramount Building, 1633 Broadway, Water Infiltration Investigation, New
York, NY
Town of Groton, Department of Public Works, Groton Public Safety Building, Water Infiltration Investiga-
tion, Groton, CT
Franklin & Marshall College, Keiper Hall/Green Room Theatre, Water Infiltration Investigation, Lan-
caster, PA
LoRicco, Trotta & LoRicco, LLC, LoRicco Tower, Water Infiltration Investigation, New Haven, CT
St. Sebastian Church, Water Infiltration Investigation and Structural Feasibility Study, Middletown, CT
Equity Office Management Corporation, Four Stamford Plaza, Water Infiltration and Garage Stairwell
Enclosure, Stamford, CT
Northland Investment Corporation, 242 Trumbull Street/40 Pratt Street, Water Infiltration Investigation,
Hartford, CT
Grubb & Ellis Management Services, Inc., 71 Fountain Terrace, Water Infiltration Consulting Services, Stam-
ford, CT
Blessed Kateri Tekkakwitha Parish, Water Infiltration Investigation, Sparta, NJ
IBM North Castle Facility, Water Infiltration Investigation, Armonk, NY
Danielson Superior Courthouse, Water Infiltration Investigation, Danielson, CT
Bristol Myers Squibb, F Wing/EF Node, Water Infiltration Investigation, Wallingford, CT
Smithsonian Institution, Old Patent Office Building, Moisture Intrusion Investigation, Washington, DC
State of Connecticut, Department of Public Works, Eastern Connecticut State University, Burr Hall,
Water Infiltration Survey, Willimantic, CT
St. Gregory the Great Catholic Church, Water Infiltration Investigation, Danbury, CT
St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Water Infiltration Investigation, Darien, CT
The George Washington University, Lerner Hall, Water Infiltration Investigation, Washington, DC
University of Connecticut, Dodd Archives, Water Infiltration Investigation, Storrs, CT
Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Water Infiltration Investigation, Washington, DC
University of Connecticut, Gully Hall, Water Infiltration Investigation, Storrs, CT
National Air & Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Water Infiltration Investigation and Rehabilitation,
Washington, DC
Southern Connecticut State University, Water Infiltration Investigation and Masonry Repair, New
Haven, CT
Hoffmann Architects Specialists in the Rehabilitation of Building Exteriors

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